We know you have questions about the dentist.

Below are some of the most common things we’re asked about our Practice.

What is a pediatric dentist?

A pediatric dentist has specialized training and education in services catered towards infants, kids, and teenagers. He or she must complete 2-3 extra years of education and training in addition to dental school. With all of this extra training and educational requirements, the pediatric dentist is the best choice for your kid’s oral care.

Thumb sucking—is it bad for my child?

Many children and infants find that sucking is a natural, calming reflex, sometimes inducing sleep. When kids pursue thumb sucking after their permanent teeth have erupted, there is a chance that they can do damage to teeth alignment and the natural growth patterns of their mouth. There are certain approaches that parents can take in order to help their child stop thumb sucking. Please speak with one of our dentists to find our more information.

Do I stay with my child in the treatment room during the visit?

If your child is over the age of 3, we ask that you allow them to accompany our staff through the dental experience. We are all highly experienced in helping children overcome dental anxiety.

Separation anxiety is not uncommon in children, so please try not to be concerned if your child exhibits some negative behavior. This is normal and will soon diminish. Studies and experience have shown that most children over the age of 3 react more positively when permitted to experience the dental visit on their own and in an environment designed for children.

When will my child get their baby teeth?

Believe it or not, children begin forming their baby teeth before they’re even born! You can start to see your child’s baby teeth erupting through the gums around 4 months of age or later. The first baby teeth to erupt are the lower central incisors. All 20 primary teeth typically appear by the age of 3, and the pace at which this happens varies.

Around the age of 6, the permanent teeth will begin to appear. This starts with the first molars, along with the lower central incisors. Once your child gets all of their teeth, he or she will have 28 permanent teeth as an adult (or up to 32 permanent teeth including their wisdom teeth, also referred as third molars).